Lamar, Kendrick

Vinyl Records and Rare LPs:

Damn.
Colored Vinyl - New - B0032372-01
Sealed 2020 180gm 2LP Limited Edition Repress On Translucent Forest Green Coloured Vinyl. more
Damn.
Used - LP - B0026745-01
2017 2-LP Gatefold. more
Good Kid, m.A.A.d City
New - LP - B0017695-01
Sealed Reissue 2LP Deluxe Edition, With 3 Bonus Tracks. European Import. Groundbreaking Modern Hip-Hop. "Hip-hop Debuts Don't Come Much More "Highly Anticipated" Than Kendrick Lamar's. A Series Of Killer Mixtapes Displayed His Talent For Thought-provoking Street Lyrics Delivered With An Attention-grabbing Flow, And Then There Was His Membership In The Black Hippy Crew With His Brethren Ab-soul, Schoolboy Q, And Jay Rock All Issuing Solo Releases That Pleased The "True Hip-hop" Set, Setting The Stage For A Massive Fourth And Final. Top It Off With A Pre-release Xxl Magazine Cover That He Shared With His Label Boss And All-around Legend Dr. Dre, And The "Biggest Debut Since Illmatic" Stuff Starts To Flow, But Good Kid, M.a.a.d. City Would Be A Milestone Even Without The Back-story, Offering Cool And Compelling Lyrics, Great Guests (Drake, Dr. Dre, And Mc Eiht) And Attractive Production (From Pharrell, Just Blaze, Tabu, And Others). Here, Kendrick Is Living His Life Like Status And Cash Were Extra Credit. It Is What Makes This Kid So "Good" As He Navigates His "Mad" City (Compton) With Experience And Wisdom Beyond His Years (25). He's Shamelessly Bold About The Allure Of The Trap, Contrasting The Sickness Of His City With The Universal Feeling Of Getting Homesick, And Carrying A Springsteen-sized Love For The Home Team. Course, In His Gang-ruled City, N.w.a. Was The Home Team, But As The Truly Beautiful, Steeped-in-soul, Biographic Key Track "The Art Of Peer Pressure" Finds A Reluctant Young Kendrick And His Friends Feeding Off The Life-force Of Young Jeezy's Debut Album, It's Something Clash, Public Enemy, And All Other Rebel Music Fans Can Relate To. Still, When He Realizes That Hero Jeezy Must Have Risen Above The Game -- Because The Real Playas Are Damned And Never Show Their Faces -- It Spawns A Kind Of Elevated Gangsta Rap That's As Pimp-connectable As The Most Vicious Eazy-e, And Yet Poignant Enough To Blow The Dust Off Any Cracked Soul. Equally Heavy Is The Cautionary Tale Of Drank Dubbed "Swimming Pools," Yet That Highlight Is As Hooky And Hallucinatory As Most Houston Drank Anthems, And Breaks Off Into One Of The Chilling, Cassette-quality Interludes That Connect The Album, Adding To The Documentary Or Eavesdropping Quality Of It All. Soul Children Will Experience Déjà Vu When "Poetic Justice" Slides By With Its Janet Jackson Sample -- Sounding Like It Came Off His Aunt's Vhs Copy Of The Movie It's Named After -- While The Closing "Compton" Is An Anthem Sure To Make The Game Jealous, Featuring Dre In Beast Mode, Acting Pre-chronic And Pre-death Row. This Journey Through The Concrete Jungle Of Compton Is Worth Taking Because Of The Artistic Richness Within, Plus The Attraction Of A Whip-smart Rapper Flying High During His Rookie Season. Any Hesitation About The Horror Of It All Is Quickly Wiped Away By Kendrick's Mix Of True Talk, Open Heart, Open Mind, And Extended Hand. Add It All Up And Even Without The Hype, This One Is Still Potent And Smart Enough To Rise To The Top Of The Pile." AMG Review By David Jeffries.
more
Good Kid, M.A.A.d City
New - LP - B0017695-01
Sealed 2021 2LP Repress. "Hip-hop Debuts Don't Come Much More "Highly Anticipated" Than Kendrick Lamar's. A Series Of Killer Mixtapes Displayed His Talent For Thought-provoking Street Lyrics Delivered With An Attention-grabbing Flow, And Then There Was His Membership In The Black Hippy Crew With His Brethren Ab-soul, Schoolboy Q, And Jay Rock All Issuing Solo Releases That Pleased The "True Hip-hop" Set, Setting The Stage For A Massive Fourth And Final. Top It Off With A Pre-release Xxl Magazine Cover That He Shared With His Label Boss And All-around Legend Dr. Dre, And The "Biggest Debut Since Illmatic" Stuff Starts To Flow, But Good Kid, M.a.a.d. City Would Be A Milestone Even Without The Back-story, Offering Cool And Compelling Lyrics, Great Guests (Drake, Dr. Dre, And Mc Eiht) And Attractive Production (From Pharrell, Just Blaze, Tabu, And Others). Here, Kendrick Is Living His Life Like Status And Cash Were Extra Credit. It Is What Makes This Kid So "Good" As He Navigates His "Mad" City (Compton) With Experience And Wisdom Beyond His Years (25). He's Shamelessly Bold About The Allure Of The Trap, Contrasting The Sickness Of His City With The Universal Feeling Of Getting Homesick, And Carrying A Springsteen-sized Love For The Home Team. Course, In His Gang-ruled City, N.w.a. Was The Home Team, But As The Truly Beautiful, Steeped-in-soul, Biographic Key Track "The Art Of Peer Pressure" Finds A Reluctant Young Kendrick And His Friends Feeding Off The Life-force Of Young Jeezy's Debut Album, It's Something Clash, Public Enemy, And All Other Rebel Music Fans Can Relate To. Still, When He Realizes That Hero Jeezy Must Have Risen Above The Game -- Because The Real Playas Are Damned And Never Show Their Faces -- It Spawns A Kind Of Elevated Gangsta Rap That's As Pimp-connectable As The Most Vicious Eazy-e, And Yet Poignant Enough To Blow The Dust Off Any Cracked Soul. Equally Heavy Is The Cautionary Tale Of Drank Dubbed "Swimming Pools," Yet That Highlight Is As Hooky And Hallucinatory As Most Houston Drank Anthems, And Breaks Off Into One Of The Chilling, Cassette-quality Interludes That Connect The Album, Adding To The Documentary Or Eavesdropping Quality Of It All. Soul Children Will Experience Déjà Vu When "Poetic Justice" Slides By With Its Janet Jackson Sample -- Sounding Like It Came Off His Aunt's Vhs Copy Of The Movie It's Named After -- While The Closing "Compton" Is An Anthem Sure To Make The Game Jealous, Featuring Dre In Beast Mode, Acting Pre-chronic And Pre-death Row. This Journey Through The Concrete Jungle Of Compton Is Worth Taking Because Of The Artistic Richness Within, Plus The Attraction Of A Whip-smart Rapper Flying High During His Rookie Season. Any Hesitation About The Horror Of It All Is Quickly Wiped Away By Kendrick's Mix Of True Talk, Open Heart, Open Mind, And Extended Hand. Add It All Up And Even Without The Hype, This One Is Still Potent And Smart Enough To Rise To The Top Of The Pile." AMG Review By David Jeffries. more
Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers
New - LP - B0035986-01
Sealed 2022 2LP Original, No Hype Sticker. "As Early As His First Official Studio Release, 2011’s Section.80, Kendrick Lamar’s Albums Have Been Intricate And Conceptual, Constructed More Like Ambitious Theatrical Narratives Than Mere Collections Of Songs. Fifth Album Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers Follows This Trajectory As A Double-Album’s Worth Of Interconnecting Statements That Are Relentlessly Complex, Emotionally Dense, And Sometimes Uncomfortably Raw. Unlike The Lush, Spacious Sonics Of Damn. Or The Life-Affirming Funk Of To Pimp A Butterfly, Mr. Morale Is Scattered Both In Terms Of Musical Approaches And Lyrical Perspectives. The Album’s First Half Is Particularly Messy, With Themes Of Trauma, Grief, Society, And Kendrick’s Own Uneasy Relationship With Fame All Overlapping. His Technical Abilities Are Stunning And Versatile As Ever, But The Frantic Flows And Jarring Beat Switches Of “United In Grief” Begin An Angsty Catharsis That Runs Throughout Many Of The Tracks. “n95” Is A Seething Cultural Critique Where Lamar Spits Bile In Multiple Directions Over A Bleakly Catchy, Bass-driven Instrumental. Issues With Lust Addiction And Infidelity Are Put Under A Microscope On The Tense And Minimal “worldwide Steppers,” And Lamar Depicts His Troubled Relationship With His Father In Painful Detail On “father Time,” Which Features A Gorgeous Vocal Performance By Sampha On The Hook. There’s Further Exploration Of Deeply Personal Family History On “Auntie Diaries,” Which Chronicles Lamar Coming To Understand The Experiences Two Of His Relatives Had With Transitioning Gender Identities. Throughout The Album He Funnels All Of These Experiences Inward, Seeking To Grow Through His Own Changes And The Changes He Sees Around Him. This Shows Up As A Dismissal Of Celebrity On “rich Spirit” Or As Striving For Self-Acceptance On “count Me Out.” The Album’s Quick Musical And Thematic Shifts Can Make For An Uneven Flow. The Floating R&B Instrumental And Tender Introspection Of “die Hard” Come Just A Few Tracks Before Cacophonous Swirls Of Piano On “Rich - Interlude” And The Jagged Cosmic Hip-Hop Of Ghostface Killah And Summer Walker Collaboration “purple Hearts.” The Album’s Intensity Reaches A Full Boil On “we Cry Together,” A Song That Sounds Like Live Audio Footage Of The Most Vicious Couple’s Argument Imaginable, And Reaches The Same Levels Of Ugliness As Eminem’s “Kim,” A Clear Reference Point. As Always, The Production Is Immaculate And Lamar Is Joined By A Host Of Industry Giants, With Contributions Coming From Baby Keem, Thundercat, And Even A Vocal Cameo From Portishead’s Beth Gibbons On The Stunning Sadness Of “mother I Sober.” While Not As Immediately Accessible As Some Of The Work That Came Before It, There’s Value In Both The Harrowing And Enlightening Moments Here. Lamar Puts Everything On The Table With Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers, Trying To Get Closer To His Unfiltered Personal Truth, And Creating Some Of His Most Challenging, Expectation-defying Work In The Process. While Not Always An Easy Listen, The Album Shows More Of Its Intention As It Goes, And Ultimately Makes Sense As The Next Logical Step Forward In Lamar’s Increasingly Multi-Dimensional Artistic Evolution." AMG Review By Fred Thomas. more
Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers
New - LP - B0035986-01
Sealed 2022 2LP Original, No Hype Sticker. "As Early As His First Official Studio Release, 2011’s Section.80, Kendrick Lamar’s Albums Have Been Intricate And Conceptual, Constructed More Like Ambitious Theatrical Narratives Than Mere Collections Of Songs. Fifth Album Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers Follows This Trajectory As A Double-Album’s Worth Of Interconnecting Statements That Are Relentlessly Complex, Emotionally Dense, And Sometimes Uncomfortably Raw. Unlike The Lush, Spacious Sonics Of Damn. Or The Life-Affirming Funk Of To Pimp A Butterfly, Mr. Morale Is Scattered Both In Terms Of Musical Approaches And Lyrical Perspectives. The Album’s First Half Is Particularly Messy, With Themes Of Trauma, Grief, Society, And Kendrick’s Own Uneasy Relationship With Fame All Overlapping. His Technical Abilities Are Stunning And Versatile As Ever, But The Frantic Flows And Jarring Beat Switches Of “United In Grief” Begin An Angsty Catharsis That Runs Throughout Many Of The Tracks. “n95” Is A Seething Cultural Critique Where Lamar Spits Bile In Multiple Directions Over A Bleakly Catchy, Bass-driven Instrumental. Issues With Lust Addiction And Infidelity Are Put Under A Microscope On The Tense And Minimal “worldwide Steppers,” And Lamar Depicts His Troubled Relationship With His Father In Painful Detail On “father Time,” Which Features A Gorgeous Vocal Performance By Sampha On The Hook. There’s Further Exploration Of Deeply Personal Family History On “Auntie Diaries,” Which Chronicles Lamar Coming To Understand The Experiences Two Of His Relatives Had With Transitioning Gender Identities. Throughout The Album He Funnels All Of These Experiences Inward, Seeking To Grow Through His Own Changes And The Changes He Sees Around Him. This Shows Up As A Dismissal Of Celebrity On “rich Spirit” Or As Striving For Self-Acceptance On “count Me Out.” The Album’s Quick Musical And Thematic Shifts Can Make For An Uneven Flow. The Floating R&B Instrumental And Tender Introspection Of “die Hard” Come Just A Few Tracks Before Cacophonous Swirls Of Piano On “Rich - Interlude” And The Jagged Cosmic Hip-Hop Of Ghostface Killah And Summer Walker Collaboration “purple Hearts.” The Album’s Intensity Reaches A Full Boil On “we Cry Together,” A Song That Sounds Like Live Audio Footage Of The Most Vicious Couple’s Argument Imaginable, And Reaches The Same Levels Of Ugliness As Eminem’s “Kim,” A Clear Reference Point. As Always, The Production Is Immaculate And Lamar Is Joined By A Host Of Industry Giants, With Contributions Coming From Baby Keem, Thundercat, And Even A Vocal Cameo From Portishead’s Beth Gibbons On The Stunning Sadness Of “mother I Sober.” While Not As Immediately Accessible As Some Of The Work That Came Before It, There’s Value In Both The Harrowing And Enlightening Moments Here. Lamar Puts Everything On The Table With Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers, Trying To Get Closer To His Unfiltered Personal Truth, And Creating Some Of His Most Challenging, Expectation-defying Work In The Process. While Not Always An Easy Listen, The Album Shows More Of Its Intention As It Goes, And Ultimately Makes Sense As The Next Logical Step Forward In Lamar’s Increasingly Multi-Dimensional Artistic Evolution." AMG Review By Fred Thomas. more
To Pimp A Butterfly
New - LP - B0023464-01
Sealed 2022 Reppress. 180gm 2LP Gatefold. Viewed As An Instant Classic, Garnering Seven Grammy Nominations. Featuring An Incredible Array Of Contributing Talent, From Thundercat, Flying Lotus, Bilal, Snoop Dogg, Pharell, Robert Glasper, Kamasi Washington To Name But A Few! Not Forgetting Vocals From Legends George Clinton And Ronald Isley. No Made In Poland Sticker On Rear Shrink. more
To Pimp A Butterfly
New - LP - B0023464-01
Sealed 2015 180gm 2LP Gatefold. Viewed As An Instant Classic, Garnering Seven Grammy Nominations. Featuring An Incredible Array Of Contributing Talent, From Thundercat, Flying Lotus, Bilal, Snoop Dogg, Pharell, Robert Glasper, Kamasi Washington To Name But A Few! Not Forgetting Vocals From Legends George Clinton And Ronald Isley. more
To Pimp A Butterfly
New - LP - B0023464-01
Sealed 2015 180gm 2LP Import Gatefold. more
Untitled Unmastered.
New - LP - B0024922
Sealed 2016 Original. "There Are Few Unfamiliar Messages And It's All Dense And Considered, But Never Overwrought Or Explicitly Angry. What Really Emerges Is Kendrick's Nuanced Worldview." — NME more
Untitled Unmastered.
New Import - 00602547866813
Sealed 2016 Original. "There Are Few Unfamiliar Messages And It's All Dense And Considered, But Never Overwrought Or Explicitly Angry. What Really Emerges Is Kendrick's Nuanced Worldview." — NME more

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