Mahal, Taj

Vinyl Records and Rare LPs:

An Evening Of Acoustic Music
Used - LP - T&M 1004
Mint 2009 2LP 180gm HQ Import Housed In A Gatefold Jacket. The First Vinyl Edition Of Taj Mahal's Legendary Bremen Concert From October 1993 Is A True Piece Of Art. Not Only Did The Renowned Berlin Visual Artist Henning Wagenbreth Again Design The Cover, He Decided To Come Up With A New Picture For Each Song, The Combination Of Which Constitutes The Album Sleeve. This Wonderful German Visual Artist Proves How Much His Work Is Sparked By His Love For African-American Culture. With These New Paintings, The Classic Mahal Solo/Duo Performances - Howard Johnson Guests On Five Tracks - Is Enriched In A Vibrant And Meaningful Kind Of Way, Adding To A New Listening Experience. more
Anthology Volume 1
Used - LP - PC 34466
1977 White Label Promo. more
Everybody Is Somebody
Used - 12 - 18 1211
Rare Radio Only White Label Promo 12" Single Housed In A Generic Die Cut White Sleeve With Custom Promotional Sticker. Features "Everybody Is Somebody" B/W "Deed I Do." more
Giant Step
New - LP - GP 18
Factory Sealed 2LP Gatefold Demo Sticker On Back Cover. Probably A 2nd Label. more
Giant Step / De Ole Folks At Home
New - LP - CG 18
Sealed 2LP Gatefold Stereo. Label Variation Unknown. more
Giant Step / De Ole Folks At Home
Used - LP - GP 18
Stunning 1969 360 Stereo Label 2LP Gatefold Original. 1C/1C/1G/1D Stampers. Both LPs Appear Unplayed. “In Less Than 24 Months, Taj Mahal (Guitars/Vocals/Banjo/Harmonica) Had Issued The Equivalent Of Four Respective Long Players. The Electric Giant Step (1968) Was Released Alongside The Acoustic And Decidedly Rural De Ole Folks At Home (1968). The Nine Cuts On Giant Step Feature Support From The Instrumental Trio Of Jessie Ed Davis (Guitar/Keyboards), Gary Gilmore (Bass) And Chuck Blackwell (Drums). They Back Taj Mahal On A Wide Selection Of Covers Ranging From Carole King And Gerry Goffin's "Take A Giant Step" To The Upbeat And Soulful Reading Of The Huddie Ledbetter Blues Staple "Keep Your Hands Off Her"." The Arrangements Are Unique And Offer The Artist's Distinctive Approach. Nowhere Is This More Evident Than The Practically Jovial Mid-Tempo "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl" Or The Freewheeling Abandon That Is Brought To The 18-Wheeler Anthem "Six Days On The Road," Recalling The Version Of "Ain't That A Lot Of Love" From Taj Mahal's Preceding Effort Natch'l Blues (1968). Additionally, Blind Willie Johnson's "You're Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond" Stands Out With A Strong And Soaring Gospel-Flavoured Score. Giant Step Concludes With "Bacon Fat," A Number Attributed Here Via Garth Hudson And Robbie Robertson Of The Band. Parties Searching For An Apt Introduction When Discovering Taj Mahal's Voluminous Catalogue Are Encouraged To Consider Giant Step As A Highly Recommended Reference Point.” Lindsay Planer, AMG. more
Giant Step / De Ole Folks At Home
Used - LP - CG 00018
70's Era 2LP Gatefold Reissue. Appears Unplayed. more
Giant Step / De Ole Folks At Home
Used - LP - GP 18
1971 2LP Gatefold Reissue On The Red & Gold "1-Eye" Label. With Custom Printed Newspaper Style Inners. Strong VG+ Vinyl With Nice. Cover Shows Ring Wear, With Clean Spine & Light Top And Bottom Seam Rubbing. "In Less Than 24 Months, Taj Mahal (Guitars/Vocals/Banjo/Harmonica) Had Issued The Equivalent Of Four Respective Long-Players. The Electric Giant Step (1968) Was Released Alongside The Acoustic And Decidedly Rural De Ole Folks At Home (1968). The Nine Cuts On Giant Step Feature Support From The Instrumental Trio Of Jesse Ed Davis (Guitar/Keyboards), Gary Gilmore (Bass), And Chuck Blackwell (Drums). They Back Taj Mahal On A Wide Selection Of Covers Ranging From Carole King And Gerry Goffin's "Take A Giant Step" To The Upbeat And Soulful Reading Of The Huddie Ledbetter Blues Staple "Keep Your Hands Off Her." The Arrangements Are Unique And Offer The Artist's Distinctive Approach. Nowhere Is This More Evident Than The Practically Jovial Midtempo "Good Morning Little Schoolgirl" Or The Freewheeling Abandon Brought To The 18-wheeler Anthem "Six Days On The Road"." Similarly, It Recalls The Version Of "Ain't That A Lot Of Love" From Taj Mahal's Preceding Lp Natch'l Blues (1968). Additionally, Blind Willie Johnson's "You're Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond" Stands Out With A Strong And Soaring Gospel-Flavored Arrangement. The Project Concludes With "Bacon Fat," A Number Attributed Here Via Garth Hudson And Robbie Robertson Of The Band. That Said, It May Be Better-Known From The Man They Called Mr. Rhythm, Andre Williams, Whose Scattered Down-Home Spoken Interludes Punctuate His February 1957 Top Ten R&b Hit -- Which Incidentally Was Created Under The Working Title "Diddle, Diddle Womp, Womp." Parties Searching For An Apt Introduction When Discovering Taj Mahal's Voluminous Catalog Are Encouraged To Consider Giant Step As A Highly Recommended Reference Point." AMG Review By Lindsay Planer. more
Happy Just To Be Like I Am
New - LP - C 30767
First Sealed Copy Of This 1971 Gatefold Original We Have Ever Had In Stock. “Taj Mahal Had Mapped Out A Unique Vision Of Country Blues And Its Ethnographic Sources On His First Three Albums, And His Fourth LP, Happy Just To Be Like I Am, Continued In A Similar Vein While Broadening His Scope At The Same Time. Anyone Who Delivers An Arrangement Of "Oh Susanna" That Marries A Hard-Boogeying Rhythm Section With A Fife As Lead Instrument Is Clearly Not Aiming For A Purist's Approach To The Blues, And Mahal Was Willing To Bring A Bit More Contemporary Rhythm & Blues Into His Formula Here, With The Title Track Boasting The Kind Of Groove And Melodic Lift That Should Have Earned It A Place On The Radio (Through The Fact A Tuba Accompanies An Electric Bass In The Bottom End Might Have Puzzled A Few Programmers), And "Chevrolet" Bubbling With Potent, Organic Funk. But Mahal Was (And Is) Far Too Enamored Of Eclecticism To Make An Entire Album That Follows A Single Direction, And The Steel Drum Reverie Of "West Indian Revelation," The Mixture Of African Percussion And Steel Guitar On "Black Spirit Boogie," And The Acoustic Blues With Tuned Cowbells On "Eighteen Hammers" Are All The Work Of A Man Eager To Twist His Music Into A Variety Of Different Forms. The Best Songs Are Impressive, Mahal's Collaborators Are Stellar (Including Jesse Ed Davis, John Simon, And Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu), And Every Track Is Filled With A Palpable Joy; It's A Fine Collection From One The Most Cheerful Iconoclasts Of The Blues. “ Mark Deming, AMG. more
Happy Just To Be Like I Am
Used - LP - C 30767
1971 Gatefold, Stereo Original. Vinyl Appears Unplayed. "Complimentary Not For Sale" Sticker On Back Jacket. “Taj Mahal Had Mapped Out A Unique Vision Of Country Blues And Its Ethnographic Sources On His First Three Albums, And His Fourth LP, Happy Just To Be Like I Am, Continued In A Similar Vein While Broadening His Scope At The Same Time. Anyone Who Delivers An Arrangement Of "Oh Susanna" That Marries A Hard-Boogeying Rhythm Section With A Fife As Lead Instrument Is Clearly Not Aiming For A Purist's Approach To The Blues, And Mahal Was Willing To Bring A Bit More Contemporary Rhythm & Blues Into His Formula Here, With The Title Track Boasting The Kind Of Groove And Melodic Lift That Should Have Earned It A Place On The Radio (Through The Fact A Tuba Accompanies An Electric Bass In The Bottom End Might Have Puzzled A Few Programmers), And "Chevrolet" Bubbling With Potent, Organic Funk. But Mahal Was (And Is) Far Too Enamored Of Eclecticism To Make An Entire Album That Follows A Single Direction, And The Steel Drum Reverie Of "West Indian Revelation," The Mixture Of African Percussion And Steel Guitar On "Black Spirit Boogie," And The Acoustic Blues With Tuned Cowbells On "Eighteen Hammers" Are All The Work Of A Man Eager To Twist His Music Into A Variety Of Different Forms. The Best Songs Are Impressive, Mahal's Collaborators Are Stellar (Including Jesse Ed Davis, John Simon, And Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu), And Every Track Is Filled With A Palpable Joy; It's A Fine Collection From One The Most Cheerful Iconoclasts Of The Blues. “ - Mark Deming, AMG. more
Happy Just To Be Like I Am
New - CD - MFCD 765
Sealed 1991 Original Master Recording Aluminum CD Housed In Original Lift-Lock Jewel Case. "Taj Mahal Had Mapped Out A Unique Vision Of Country Blues And Its Ethnographic Sources On His First Three Albums, And His Fourth, Happy Just To Be Like I Am, Continued In A Similar Vein While Broadening His Scope At The Same Time. Anyone Who Delivers An Arrangement Of "Oh Susanna" That Marries A Hard-Boogeying Rhythm Section With A Fife As Lead Instrument Is Clearly Not Aiming For A Purist's Approach To The Blues, And Mahal Was Willing To Bring A Bit More Contemporary Rhythm & Blues Into His Formula Here, With The Title Track Boasting The Kind Of Groove And Melodic Lift That Should Have Earned It A Place On The Radio (Through The Fact A Tuba Accompanies An Electric Bass In The Bottom End Might Have Puzzled A Few Programmers), And "Chevrolet" Bubbling With Potent, Organic Funk. But Mahal Was (And Is) Far Too Enamored Of Eclecticism To Make An Entire Album That Follows A Single Direction, And The Steel Drum Reverie Of "West Indian Revelation," The Mixture Of African Percussion And Steel Guitar On "Black Spirit Boogie," And The Acoustic Blues With Tuned Cowbells On "Eighteen Hammers" Are All The Work Of A Man Eager To Twist His Music Into A Variety Of Different Forms. The Best Songs Are Impressive, Mahal's Collaborators Are Stellar (Including Jesse Ed Davis, John Simon, And Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu), And Every Track Is Filled With A Palpable Joy; It's A Fine Collection From One The Most Cheerful Iconoclasts Of The Blues.“ Mark Deming, AMG. more
Live & Direct
Audiophile - LP - CCX 5011
Beautiful 1979 Limited Edition Direct-To-Disc. CC. Unplayed Condition. more
Live & Direct
Audiophile - LP - CCX 5011
Factory Sealed, Limited Edition Direct-To-Disk Recording. 1st Sealed Copy We Have Seen In Ages. Crisp Corners, No Seam Splits. more
Mo' Roots
Used - LP - KC 33051
Mint 1974 Original In Shrink Wrap. 1A/1B Matrixes. more
Mo' Roots
New - LP - KC 33051
Sealed 1974 Original. “Mo' Roots Finds Mahal Stepping Away From The Blues, Choosing Instead To Focus On Reggae. While He Can Often Be Faulted For His All-Too-Academic Approach, With Mo' Roots He Turns In An Album That Truly Expresses His Appreciation And Connection With The Music.” AMG. more
Music Fuh Ya
Used - LP - BS 2994
1976 Test Pressing In White Jacket. more
Music Fuh Ya'
New - LP - BS 2994
Factory Sealed 1977 Original. more
Music Fuh Ya'
Used - LP - BS 2994
1977 Original. Promo Sticker On Jacket. Appears Unplayed. more
Music Keeps Me Together
New - LP - PC 33801
Sealed And Pristine 1975 Original. more
Natch'l Blues
Used - LP - CS 9698
1968 360 Stereo Original, 1B/1B Stampers. Vinyl Appears Glossy. Very Light Ring Wear On Back Cover. “Recorded In The Spring And Fall Of 1968, This Album Opens With More Stripped-Down Delta-Style Blues In The Manner Of His Debut, But Adds A Little More Amplification (Partly Courtesy Of Al Kooper On Organ) Before Moving Into Wholly Bigger Sound On Numbers Like "She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride" And "The Cuckoo" — The Latter, In Particular, Features Crunchy Electric And Acoustic Guitars And Gary Gilmore Playing His Bass Almost Like A Lead Instrument, Like A Bluesman's Answer To John Entwistle. Most Notable, However, May Be The Two Original Closing Numbers, "You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry)" And "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," Which Offer Taj Mahal Working In The Realm Of Soul And Treading Onto Otis Redding Territory. This Is Particularly Notable On "You Don't Miss Your Water," Which Achieves The Intensity Of A Gospel Performance And Comes Complete With A Stax/Volt-Style Horn Arrangement By Jesse Ed Davis That Sounds More Like The Real Thing Than The Real Thing. "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," By Contrast, Is Driven By A Hard Electric Guitar Sound And A Relentless Bass Part That Sounds Like A More Urgent Version Of The Bassline From The Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'." Bruce Eder, AMG. Top Recommendation. more
Natch'l Blues
New - LP - CS 9698
Factory Sealed Stereo (Label Variation Unknown, But Likely A 2nd Label). “Recorded In The Spring And Fall Of 1968, This Album Opens With More Stripped-Down Delta-Style Blues In The Manner Of His Debut, But Adds A Little More Amplification (Partly Courtesy Of Al Kooper On Organ) Before Moving Into Wholly Bigger Sound On Numbers Like "She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride" And "The Cuckoo" — The Latter, In Particular, Features Crunchy Electric And Acoustic Guitars And Gary Gilmore Playing His Bass Almost Like A Lead Instrument, Like A Bluesman's Answer To John Entwistle. Most Notable, However, May Be The Two Original Closing Numbers, "You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry)" And "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," Which Offer Taj Mahal Working In The Realm Of Soul And Treading Onto Otis Redding Territory. This Is Particularly Notable On "You Don't Miss Your Water," Which Achieves The Intensity Of A Gospel Performance And Comes Complete With A Stax/Volt-Style Horn Arrangement By Jesse Ed Davis That Sounds More Like The Real Thing Than The Real Thing. "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," By Contrast, Is Driven By A Hard Electric Guitar Sound And A Relentless Bass Part That Sounds Like A More Urgent Version Of The Bassline From The Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'." Bruce Eder, AMG. Top Recommendation. more
Natch'l Blues
Used - LP - CS 9698
Beautiful 2nd Label (Originally Released As A 360 Stereo). Appears Unplayed. “Recorded In The Spring And Fall Of 1968, This Album Opens With More Stripped-Down Delta-Style Blues In The Manner Of His Debut, But Adds A Little More Amplification (Partly Courtesy Of Al Kooper On Organ) Before Moving Into Wholly Bigger Sound On Numbers Like "She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride" And "The Cuckoo" — The Latter, In Particular, Features Crunchy Electric And Acoustic Guitars And Gary Gilmore Playing His Bass Almost Like A Lead Instrument, Like A Bluesman's Answer To John Entwistle. Most Notable, However, May Be The Two Original Closing Numbers, "You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry)" And "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," Which Offer Taj Mahal Working In The Realm Of Soul And Treading Onto Otis Redding Territory. This Is Particularly Notable On "You Don't Miss Your Water," Which Achieves The Intensity Of A Gospel Performance And Comes Complete With A Stax/Volt-Style Horn Arrangement By Jesse Ed Davis That Sounds More Like The Real Thing Than The Real Thing. "Ain't That A Lot Of Love," By Contrast, Is Driven By A Hard Electric Guitar Sound And A Relentless Bass Part That Sounds Like A More Urgent Version Of The Bassline From The Spencer Davis Group's "Gimme Some Lovin'." Bruce Eder, AMG. Top Recommendation. more
Oooh So Good 'N Blues
Used - LP - C 32600
1973 Original With Custom Inner Sleeve. 1B/1A Stampers. Unplayed Condition. more
Oooh So Good 'N Blues
Used - LP - KC 32600
1973 Original Still In Shrink. more
Recycling The Blues & Other Related Stuff
New - LP - PC 31605
Sealed 1972 Textured Cover Original Featuring The Pointer Sisters. more
Recycling The Blues & Other Related Stuff
Used - CD - MFCD 764
1991 Original Master Recording Aluminum CD Housed In Original Lift-Lock Jewel Case. Features The Pointer Sisters. CD And Insert In Excellent Condition. Light Shelf Wear To Case. more
Satisfied 'N' Tickled Too
Used - LP - PC 34103
1976 White Label Promo. LP Looks Unplayed. Radio Station Timing Strip On Front Cover. more
Sounder
Used - LP - S 31944
Mint 1972 Original Soundtrack. Features Lightnin' Hopkins. more
Sounder
New - LP - S 31944
Sealed 1972 Original. NM- Jacket, Aside From Cut Corner. His First Score For A Film, Mixing Tunes With Incidental And And Sfx Tracks. Worth Exploring! more
Taj
Used - LP - 18-8611-1
1986 Original. Features Babatunde Olatunji, Jesse 'Ed' Davis, Garnett Brown, Joyce Wilson And Others. Clean Copy! more
Taj
New - LP - 8611 1
Sealed 1986 Original. Features Babatunde Olatunji, Jesse 'Ed' Davis, Garnett Brown, Joyce Wilson And Others. Custom Song Hype Sticker On The Shrink Wrap. more
Taj
New - LP - 8611
Sealed 1986 Original. Features Babatunde Olatunji, Jesse 'Ed' Davis, Garnett Brown, Joyce Wilson And Others. more
Taj Mahal
Used - LP - CS 9579
Very Hard To Find 1968 360 Stereo Original. Features Ry Cooder. 1C/1C Stampers. Appears Glossy, Unplayed. "Taj Mahal's Debut Album Was A Startling Statement In Its Time And Has Held Up Remarkably Well. Recorded In August Of 1967, It Was As Hard And Exciting A Mix Of Old And New Blues Sounds As Surfaced On Record In A Year When Even A Lot Of Veteran Blues Artists (Mostly At The Insistence Of Their Record Labels) Started Turning Toward Psychedelia. The Guitar Virtuosity, Embodied In Taj Mahal's Slide Work (Which Had The Subtlety Of A Classical Performance), Jesse Ed Davis's Lead Playing, And Rhythm Work By Ry Cooder And Bill Boatman, Is Of The Neatly Stripped-Down Variety That Was Alien To Most Records Aiming For Popular Appeal, And The Singer Himself Approached The Music With A Startling Mix Of Authenticity And Youthful Enthusiasm. The Whole Record Is A Strange And Compelling Amalgam Of Stylistic And Technical Achievements — Filled With Blues Influences Of The 1930s And 1940s, But Also Making Use Of Stereo Sound Separation And The Best Recording Technology. The Result Was Numbers Like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," With Textures Resembling The Mix On The Early Cream Albums, While "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (Even With Cooder’s Animated Mandolin Weaving Its Spell On One Side Of The Stereo Mix) Has The Sound Of A Late '40s Chess Release By Muddy Waters. Blind Willie Mctell ("Statesboro Blues") And Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") Are Also Represented, In What Had To Be One Of The Most Quietly, Defiantly Iconoclastic Records Of 1968." Bruce Eder, AMG. more
Taj Mahal
New - LP - CS 9579
Factory Sealed 360 Stereo Original. Features Ry Cooder. "Taj Mahal's Debut Album Was A Startling Statement In Its Time And Has Held Up Remarkably Well. Recorded In August Of 1967, It Was As Hard And Exciting A Mix Of Old And New Blues Sounds As Surfaced On Record In A Year When Even A Lot Of Veteran Blues Artists (Mostly At The Insistence Of Their Record Labels) Started Turning Toward Psychedelia. The Guitar Virtuosity, Embodied In Taj Mahal's Slide Work (Which Had The Subtlety Of A Classical Performance), Jesse Ed Davis's Lead Playing, And Rhythm Work By Ry Cooder And Bill Boatman, Is Of The Neatly Stripped-Down Variety That Was Alien To Most Records Aiming For Popular Appeal, And The Singer Himself Approached The Music With A Startling Mix Of Authenticity And Youthful Enthusiasm. The Whole Record Is A Strange And Compelling Amalgam Of Stylistic And Technical Achievements — Filled With Blues Influences Of The 1930s And 1940s, But Also Making Use Of Stereo Sound Separation And The Best Recording Technology. The Result Was Numbers Like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," With Textures Resembling The Mix On The Early Cream Albums, While "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (Even With Cooder’s Animated Mandolin Weaving Its Spell On One Side Of The Stereo Mix) Has The Sound Of A Late '40s Chess Release By Muddy Waters. Blind Willie Mctell ("Statesboro Blues") And Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") Are Also Represented, In What Had To Be One Of The Most Quietly, Defiantly Iconoclastic Records Of 1968." Bruce Eder, AMG. more
Taj Mahal
Used - LP - CS 9579
Very Hard To Find 1968 360 Stereo Original. Features Ry Cooder. 1C/1C Stampers. Appears Glossy, Unplayed. Jacket Has Slight Ring Wear, Hence Price. "Taj Mahal's Debut Album Was A Startling Statement In Its Time And Has Held Up Remarkably Well. Recorded In August Of 1967, It Was As Hard And Exciting A Mix Of Old And New Blues Sounds As Surfaced On Record In A Year When Even A Lot Of Veteran Blues Artists (Mostly At The Insistence Of Their Record Labels) Started Turning Toward Psychedelia. The Guitar Virtuosity, Embodied In Taj Mahal's Slide Work (Which Had The Subtlety Of A Classical Performance), Jesse Ed Davis's Lead Playing, And Rhythm Work By Ry Cooder And Bill Boatman, Is Of The Neatly Stripped-Down Variety That Was Alien To Most Records Aiming For Popular Appeal, And The Singer Himself Approached The Music With A Startling Mix Of Authenticity And Youthful Enthusiasm. The Whole Record Is A Strange And Compelling Amalgam Of Stylistic And Technical Achievements — Filled With Blues Influences Of The 1930s And 1940s, But Also Making Use Of Stereo Sound Separation And The Best Recording Technology. The Result Was Numbers Like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," With Textures Resembling The Mix On The Early Cream Albums, While "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (Even With Cooder’s Animated Mandolin Weaving Its Spell On One Side Of The Stereo Mix) Has The Sound Of A Late '40s Chess Release By Muddy Waters. Blind Willie Mctell ("Statesboro Blues") And Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") Are Also Represented, In What Had To Be One Of The Most Quietly, Defiantly Iconoclastic Records Of 1968." Bruce Eder, AMG. more
Take Taj
Used - LP - P 19967
Rare 1987 Columbia Special Products Vinyl Featuring Previously Released Classics. 1A/1A Matrixes. Looks Unplayed And The Only Copy We Have Ever Seen! more
The Real Thing
Used - LP - G 30619
2 LP Gatefold. Recorded Live At Bill Graham's Fillmore East. 1A/1A/1A/1B Stampers. Demo Sticker On Cover. more
The Real Thing
Used - LP - G 30619
Mint 1972 2LP Gatefold Original, 1A/1C/1C/1D Stampers. Recorded Live At Fillmore East. more

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